Monday, October 29, 2007

Turkey Tail



Turkey Tail, so named for its distinctive color banding, is one of our more common forest fungi.

Attached to the side of a decaying log, the fungi is quietly going about its important task of unlocking the nutrients contained in the dead log.

The Canon Power Shot S2 IS proved to be a good tool to capture this macro

8 comments:

imac said...

Gee, theres some fungi about Salty, and youve captured that one brill.
Its quite eye catching.love it Salty.

Ashley said...

It is amazing that fungi can be so beautiful!
Check out my Travel Blog!

photowannabe said...

It really does look like turkey tail feathers or the ruffles of a flaminco dancers dress. Your little camera did a super job.

Faye Pekas said...

Wow, I've missed some good stuff lately. This fungi is certainly named well. It really does look like turkey feathers. I like the bird and chipmonk shots and love the country road one. Also enjoyed your post with Chad and Amy.

oldmanlincoln said...

I like this shot. It is a good macro. It also reminded me of a log that is almost gone, that I cut down from a silver maple many years ago. I had planted them when I didn't have money to buy nice oaks. Then when the trunk was about hugging size, I girdled one tree and left the bugs get a head start. All of the wood was used except this one section of log. I rolled it up against the fence and left it. Now, some twenty years later it is soft in the center and filled with insects.

There are men I hired to put in a new board fence and I asked them to roll the log over out of the way and it just about fell completely apart.

I can't begin to tell you how many generations of insects have made this home and the nutrition it has released into the soil has fueled a large spruce I planted. When I fence is finished I will roll it back.

Nice post.

Old Wom Tigley said...

Sometimes we come across something and wonder what it could be called... ha! not this for sure.
I think it is like our bracken fungi, some of which is edible when yound but gets tough with age, one of our bracken fungis is called Razor Strop, as you can sharpen the old style 'cut-throat razors and blade on them.

happyone said...

Thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. Your photos of PA are beautiful!!

Kerri said...

Looks like it was aptly named! Neat close up!