Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Attack!



I first spotted the Osprey perched in a tree beside the lake. Approaching with the boat, I fired multiple images although the lighting was all wrong. I fully expected the Osprey to fly away from me as always but when this bird left its perch it glided directly overhead searching for fish.

The lighting of this shot left much to be desired. I had .7 stop of overexposure dialed in to compensate for the sky background and had to further lighten the Osprey in Photoshop to achieve a reasonable quality image. Close-up examination of this image reveals a considerable amount of digital noise. With that being said I am still pleased to have captured this unique angle of a Hunting Osprey.

10 comments:

Chad Oneil Myers said...

After getting all that was possibly wrong with the image out of the way...you celebrated what was right about it.

Cool capture, Dad.

Stacey Huston said...

Salty, great shot any way you look at it! Love the feet down and talons exposed. Be glad your not a fish.. lol Thanks for sharing!

Old Wom Tigley said...

One of my favorite birds Salty... though I have yet to see one for myself...
I am pleased you got a shot of the talons.. I came across this and it explains a bit about how they catch the fish..

"The osprey has a number of specialised morphological adaptations for its fish-eating lifestyle, including nasal valves which close when it dives underwater. It has relatively long legs for a raptor and equal-lengthed toes, the outer of which is reversible, so that slippery fish can be grasped tightly with two toes in front and two behind. The talons are long and deeply-curved, and the undersides of the feet are covered in spiny bumps called spicules that help to hold the prey.

The diet consists almost entirely of fish, and the osprey is unusual amongst raptors in being so exclusively piscivorous. Both freshwater and marine fish are taken, and in the Highlands the main prey includes trout (Salmo trutta), pike (Esox lucius) and flounder (Platichthys flesus). Hunting usually begins with a hovering flight over water, or occasionally from a perch overlooking water. When a fish is targeted, the osprey dives down with its wings swept back and just before impact it brings its talons forward to plunge feet-first into the water and grasp the fish under the surface.

Success rates in catching fish vary from about 20% to over 50% of attempts, depending on the ability of the individual osprey, and a bird can sometimes be completely submerged as it takes a fish. Flapping its wings strongly, the osprey rises out of the water and once airborne it carries the fish with one foot in front of the other, so that the head is facing forward - this is presumed to be a more aerodynamic position, which makes it easier for the osprey to fly with its prey. The fish is taken to a perch, often near the nest, where it is generally eaten headfirst."

Hope you do not mind all this info..
Tom

Abraham Lincoln said...

Nice shot, Salty. Remember the old settings for film? Or what we used in Japan for black and white.

Set on infinity. f8. Shutter speed 125.

I think you can preset the cameras now for things like that but I seldom do it and have to look at the book to remember.

DeeMom said...

Awesome picture

photowannabe said...

Those talons look so menacing. I don't think he misses much of his prey. Great shot Salty. I love the action feel.

Sand said...

What a unique image. I think the fish would be scared! I know I would.

Wolf Lover Girl said...

LOVE this shot! Those talons. Those eyes!!

~ Wolf Lover Girl

fishing guy said...

Salty: Oh how I love to see the Osprey in flight. We have hunting pairs on my lake. I still haven't figured out how to keep the camera moving when i snap and the screen goes blank.

Misty Dawn said...

This is an absolutely spectacular shot!